Nom du corpus

Corpus Systématique Animale

Titre du document

Diving metabolism and thermoregulation in common and thick-billed murres

Lien vers le document
Éditeur
Springer (journals)
Langue(s) du document
Anglais
Type de document
Research-article
Mots-clés d'auteur
  • Metabolism
  • Diving
  • Thermoregulation
  • Energetics
  • Seabird, Uria
  • ADL : aerobic dive limit
  • BMR : basal metabolic rate
  • FIT : food-induced thermogenesis
  • MHP : metabolic heat production
  • MR : metabolic rate
  • PARR : post-absorption resting rate
  • RMR : resting metabolic rate
  • RQ : respiratory quotient
  • SA : surface area
  • STPD : standard temperature and pressure (25°C, 1 ATM)
  • T a : ambient temperature
  • T b : body temperature
  • T IC : Iower critical temperatiure
  • TC : thermal conductance
  • V $V_{O_2 }$ : oxygen consumption rate
  • W : body mass
Nom du fichier dans la ressource
Oiseaux_v2b_01857
Auteur(s)
  • D. A. Croll 1
  • E. McLaren 2
Affiliation(s)
  • 1) Physiological Research Laboratory, A-004 Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 92093, La Jolla, CA, USA
  • 2) Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, University of Oregon, 97420, Charleston, OR, USA
Résumé

The diving and thermoregulatory metabolic rates of two species of diving seabrid, common (Uria aalge) and thick-billed murres (U. lomvia), were studied in the laboratory. Post-absorptive resting metabolic rates were similar in both species, averaging 7.8 W·kg-1, and were not different in air or water (15–20°C). These values were 1.5–2 times higher than values predicted from published allometric equations. Feeding led to increases of 36 and 49%, diving caused increases of 82 and 140%, and preening led to increases of 107 and 196% above measured resting metabolic rates in common and thick-billed murres, respectively. Metabolic rates of both species increased linearly with decreasing water temperature; lower critical temperature was 15°C in common murres and 16°C in thick-billed murres. Conductance (assuming a constant body temperature) did not change with decreasing temperature, and was calculated at 3.59 W·m-2·oC-1 and 4.68 W·m-2·oC-1 in common and thick-billed murres, respectively. Murres spend a considerable amount of time in cold water which poses a significant thermal challenge to these relatively small seabirds. If thermal conductance does not change with decreasing water temperature, murres most likely rely upon increasing metabolism to maintain body temperature. The birds probably employ activities such as preening, diving, or food-induced thermogenesis to meet this challenge.

Catégories Science-Metrix
  • 1 - health sciences
  • 2 - biomedical research
  • 3 - physiology
Catégories INIST
  • 1 - sciences appliquees, technologies et medecines
  • 2 - sciences biologiques et medicales
  • 3 - sciences biologiques fondamentales et appliquees. psychologie
  • 4 - ethologie animale
Catégories Scopus
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology ; 3 - Endocrinology
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Agricultural and Biological Sciences ; 3 - Animal Science and Zoology
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology ; 3 - Biochemistry
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Agricultural and Biological Sciences ; 3 - Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology ; 3 - Physiology
Catégories WoS
  • 1 - science ; 2 - zoology
  • 1 - science ; 2 - physiology
Identifiant ISTEX
59A1C8EC4EE0569F8DA86E35A615D2771ECD9570
Revue

Journal of Comparative Physiology B

Année de publication
1993
Présence de XML structuré
Non
Version PDF
1.3
Score qualité du texte
9.448
Sous-corpus
  • Oiseaux
Type de publication
Journal
ark:/67375/1BB-0CMJ7LXS-6
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