Nom du corpus

Corpus Systématique Animale

Titre du document

A model for improving endangered species recovery programs

Lien vers le document
Éditeur
Springer (journals)
Langue(s) du document
Anglais
Type de document
Research-article
Mots-clés d'auteur
  • Endangered species
  • Management
  • Policy
  • Recovery plan
  • Recover team
  • Organizational structure
Nom du fichier dans la ressource
Poissons_v2b_004424
Auteur(s)
  • Brian Miller 1
  • Richard Reading 2
  • Courtney Conway 3
  • Jerome A. Jackson 4
  • Michael Hutchins 5
  • Noel Snyder 6
  • Steve Forrest 7
  • Jack Frazier 8
  • Scott Derrickson 9
Affiliation(s)
  • 1) Centro de Ecologia, UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-275, 04510, México D.F., México
  • 2) Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, 205 Prospect Street, 06511, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
  • 3) Department of Natural Resource Science, The University of Rhode Island, 02881-0804, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA
  • 4) Department of Biological Science, PO Drawer GY Mississippi State, Mississippi State University, 39762-5759, Mississippi, USA
  • 5) American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums, 7970-D Old Georgetown Road, 20814, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  • 6) Wildlife Preservation Trust International, PO Box 426, 85632, Portal, Arizona, USA
  • 7) Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund, 2008 East Calhoun, 98112, Seattle, Washington, USA
  • 8) CINVESTAV, Apartado Postal 73 “Cordemex” Mérida, 97310, Yucatán, México, C.P.
  • 9) National Zoological Park Conservation and Research Center, 22630, Front Royal, Virginia, USA
Résumé

This paper discusses common organizational problems that cause inadequate planning and implementation processes of endangered species recovery across biologically dissimilar species. If these problems occur, even proven biological conservation techniques are jeopardized. We propose a solution that requires accountability in all phases of the restoration process and is based on cooperative input among government agencies, nongovernmental conservation organizations, and the academic community. The first step is formation of a task-oriented recovery team that integrates the best expertise into the planning process. This interdisciplinary team should be composed of people whose skills directly address issues critical for recovery. Once goals and procedures are established, the responsible agency (for example, in the United States, the US Fish and Wildlife Service) could divest some or all of its obligation for implementing the plan, yet still maintain oversight by holding implementing entities contractually accountable. Regular, periodic outside review and public documentation of the recovery team, lead agency, and the accomplishments of implementing bodies would permit evaluation necessary to improve performance. Increased cooperation among agency and nongovernmental organizations provided by this model promises a more efficient use of limited resources toward the conservation of biodiversity.

Catégories Science-Metrix
  • 1 - natural sciences
  • 2 - biology
  • 3 - ecology
Catégories INIST
  • 1 - sciences humaines et sociales
  • 2 - sociologie
Catégories Scopus
  • 1 - Physical Sciences ; 2 - Environmental Science ; 3 - Pollution
  • 1 - Physical Sciences ; 2 - Environmental Science ; 3 - Ecology
  • 1 - Physical Sciences ; 2 - Environmental Science ; 3 - Global and Planetary Change
Catégories WoS
  • 1 - science ; 2 - environmental sciences
Identifiant ISTEX
F3F8DCD387A094CC47D4F8CEAC41EA4B43DCD195
Revue

Environmental Management

Année de publication
1994
Présence de XML structuré
Non
Version PDF
1.3
Score qualité du texte
9.292
Sous-corpus
  • Poissons
Type de publication
Journal
ark:/67375/1BB-087N7JSF-L
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