Nom du corpus

Corpus Systématique Animale

Titre du document

Evidence of self-correcting spiral flows in swimming boxfishes

Lien vers le document
Éditeur
IOP
Langue(s) du document
Anglais
Type de document
Article, research-article
Nom du fichier dans la ressource
Poissons_v2b_001010
Auteur(s)
  • I K Bartol 1
  • M S Gordon 2
  • P Webb 3
  • D Weihs 4
  • M Gharib 5
Affiliation(s)
  • 1) Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0266, USA
  • 2) Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, USA
  • 3) School of Natural Resources and Environment and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
  • 4) Department of Aerospace Engineering, Technion, Haifa, 3200, Israel
  • 5) Options of Bioengineering and Aeronautics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
Résumé

The marine boxfishes have rigid keeled exteriors (carapaces) unlike most fishes, yet exhibit high stability, high maneuverability and relatively low drag given their large cross-sectional area. These characteristics lend themselves well to bioinspired design. Based on previous stereolithographic boxfish model experiments, it was determined that vortical flows develop around the carapace keels, producing self-correcting forces that facilitate swimming in smooth trajectories. To determine if similar self-correcting flows occur in live, actively swimming boxfishes, two species of boxfishes (Ostracion meleagris and Lactophrys triqueter) were induced to swim against currents in a water tunnel, while flows around the fishes were quantified using digital particle image velocimetry. Significant pitch events were rare and short lived in the fishes examined. When these events were observed, spiral flows around the keels qualitatively similar to those observed around models were always present, with greater vortex circulation occurring as pitch angles deviated from 0. Vortex circulation was higher in live fishes than models presumably because of pectoral fin interaction with the keel-induced flows. The ability of boxfishes to modify their underlying self-correcting system with powered fin control is important for achieving high levels of both stability and maneuverability. Although the challenges of performing stability and maneuverability research on fishes are significant, the results of this study together with future studies employing innovative new approaches promise to provide valuable inspiration for the designers of bioinspired aquatic vehicles.

Catégories Science-Metrix
  • 1 - health sciences
  • 2 - biomedical research
  • 3 - physiology
Catégories INIST
  • 1 - sciences appliquees, technologies et medecines
  • 2 - sciences biologiques et medicales
  • 3 - sciences biologiques fondamentales et appliquees. psychologie
Catégories Scopus
  • 1 - Physical Sciences ; 2 - Engineering ; 3 - Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology ; 3 - Molecular Medicine
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology ; 3 - Biochemistry
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology ; 3 - Biophysics
  • 1 - Life Sciences ; 2 - Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology ; 3 - Biotechnology
Catégories WoS
  • 1 - science ; 2 - robotics
  • 1 - science ; 2 - materials science, biomaterials
  • 1 - science ; 2 - engineering, multidisciplinary
Identifiant ISTEX
9816130741B5A305CC1B3BD9E50938C79DCDC433
Revue

Bioinspiration & Biomimetics

Année de publication
2008
Présence de XML structuré
Oui
Version PDF
1.4
Score qualité du texte
9.028
Sous-corpus
  • Poissons
Type de publication
Journal
ark:/67375/0T8-SHJ81Q9B-H
Powered by Lodex 9.3.8